Category Archives: Dunedin

Arencibia shouldn’t apologise for Twitter-spat – and here is why

Blue Jays catcher JP Arencibia called out a sports journalist on Twitter last week. Matthew Strader has his take on the situation.


STRADER:
With the mini-twitter gate that surrounded JP Arencibia last week, and the articles I’m still reading about it, I suddenly began to wonder, why is my industry filled with a bunch of wimps?

A radio reporter from New York called Arencibia out for his low batting average.

Arencibia tweeted back, have another donut, and sports reporters of the world unite! I’ve read column after column about how Arencibia shouldn’t have done it. He went too far.

My colleague Livingstone and I discussed that day whether Arencibia, and his fellow twitter-addicted Blue Jays (Romero, Lawrie…etc.) would be asked by the organization to shut down their accounts.

It seemed plausible at the time. Organizations don’t like negative press. And athletes’ seem to get into trouble on social media all the time, so were we going to lose the insight into these players’ lives?

We haven’t, and I don’t know if anything was said to Arencibia behind closed doors, but I listen to what I’ve listened to on the radio in the past week, and read what I’ve read in the papers, and I wonder who is in the wrong here? Because every sports writer and broadcaster I’ve heard think Arencibia is, and I can’t help but think…are you kidding me? What did he do wrong?

How is it any different then what sports reporters do, and why should he be held to a different standard? Because he makes millions? Oh, yeah, right. If my paper decided to suddenly pay me $4-million a season, and Major League baseball suddenly changed the structure so that catchers made $60,000 a year, things would be completely different…..pfffft….

I don’t need to mention any names here, but here are the quotes I’ve read this week.

“They’re chokers….”

“He should be fired…”

“He’s lazy…”

“He sucks…”

“He’s fat, and out of shape, and it’s embarrassing….”

Okay, so let’s turn to the radio for some insightful and classy analysis.

“They don’t know how to play the game…”

“He sucks, and he knows it, his family knows it, I bet when he was born his parents looked at him and thought he’s gonna suck…”

“The guy should lose his job…”

“It was the worst performance I’ve ever seen and it’s what you get from this guy all the time…the worst…”

“Off with his head…Off with all their heads…”

“They are the biggest chokers in sport…”

I don’t need to continue. Everyone knows what I’m talking about.

Now, let me qualify this by saying I’m happy with all of these comments. I love the soap opera. We don’t ever find out anything great. The dressing room doors are like iron curtains, and we dig and dig and dig for insight. Players are trained to give media savvy answers, clichés really, about 110 per cent and it’s all about the team…blah blah blah. We die for an honest comment.

So if some dude decides to call Arencibia out, and Arencibia decides to call him out, then good, set up the ring, and let them go.

But Arencibia should apologize? He went too far? It was personal?

Give me a break.

It’s personal to say a guy sucks at his job. It’s personal to say a guy should lose his job.

If I write that somebody sucks, which I might, ‘cause really, the Red Sox suck, then they have every right to call me a skinny wuss who couldn’t make it past tee ball. ‘Cause I couldn’t. And I don’t need a bunch of dudes behind their keyboards to get their backs up and come to my defence. It’s okay guys. I can handle it.

I’m not a p—y.

If I were Arencibia, the next time I hit a jack, I’d make sure to have a box of donuts in the dugout, I’d grab one, look right into the camera, and chow down while holding up my Major League jersey.

That would be TV I would love to watch.

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Minor League Report: Grab a seat on the prospect bus

The Minor League Report by Write Fielder Matthew Strader takes a look at a couple of up-and-comers in the Jays system. One being Chad Jenkins (pictured above). photo courtesy of Sportsnet.ca

STRADER: One thing I am religious on is scouting the minors, so I figured I would put together a “MINOR LEAGUE REPORT” every couple of days.

I considered for a moment making some attempt at a headline that somehow incorporated “What happens in Vegas…”

But let’s be realistic. Jays’ fans aren’t going to see anyone except position players in need of at bats in Vegas, and we certainly don’t want anything to stay there.

We’re pretty much clear of two starts each for all the minor league arms that are on the radar this season, so here’s a catch up on what’s happened so far with two, and being a sucker for the up and comers, the MINOR LEAGUE REPORT will become a regular part of my repertoire.

DUNEDIN:

From the Florida State League comes statistics on one of AA’s favourites. Asher Wojciechowski. AA loves this kid. There isn’t anything to be determined from an interview with Toronto’s great Greek thinker. Media must become a poker player, read between the lines, listen to inflection of voice, tone, word choices, and try to get a read.

Three weeks ago, I pounced all over a slip of the tongue from Farrell and announced to my colleague Livingstone that Drabek would be the fifth starter. (We did not get on posting that fast enough, it was announced the next day) This past weekend, there were two names that changed the inflection of AA’s voice when he spoke them.

Wojciechowski was one of them.

He loves this kid.

The 6-foot-4, 235 pound South Carolina product was selected 41st overall in the first round of the 2010 first-year player draft. The blog isn’t paying enough (yet) for us to scout these guys live, so we go from the box.

In two starts this year, Wojciechowski has been night and day, yin and yang.

April 7: IP: 4.0 H: 9 ER: 6 SO: 2 BB: 1.

April 13: IP: 6.0 H: 2 ER: 1 SO: 4 BB: 1.

Scouting reports say plenty of fastball, but were pretty down on his secondary stuff in his draft year, calling his changeup insignificant. Until I can see him myself, I go by the stats. If the secondary stuff is weak, it looks like we’re developing another quality swing man here in the ilk of Villanueva. But there is something AA really likes about this kid, so maybe the slider is coming. In 2010, it was lacking movement and averaged 83 mph. Updated reports are calling the slider a plus pitch that he controls to both sides of the plate now. Could this be a future 2-3 starter? When I know more, you’ll know more.

NEW HAMPSHIRE:

The other time, I believe, the Blue Jay GM tipped his cap this weekend was to Chad Jenkins. And here’s my first you heard it hear first!

“Chad Jenkins will get the fifth start instead of Carreno this month.”

It’s a guess, but I’m 90 per cent. Our organization has been consistent with loyalty, so after a competitive showing earlier this month, outside of two Carlos Santana home runs, Carreno could very likely get it again, and I wouldn’t be upset to see him, but I’m predicting Jenkins.

Drafted in the first round of the 2009 first year player draft, Jenkins was known for one thing. Fastball, fastball, fastball. It was heavy, downhill with sinking action and nasty. Big body, durable, strikeouts. He sounded like a first round talent, and then silently, there wasn’t much sound at all.

With the Drabek trade, the Alvarez rise, and the McGowan return, where do you reach to grab a headline as a young starting pitcher in Toronto? Well, don’t worry. Jenkins, from what is being said, appears to have focused on conditioning and begun to progress stuff-wise and mentally, the way an organization looks for a starter too.

The stories out of spring were impressive, and the numbers, at least early in this season, are looking that way too.

In his two starts: IP: 13 H: 10 ER: 6 BB: 1 SO: 7

It’s notable that in his second start he allowed 5 ER and 3 HR, but the way AA jumped to defend that start…the wind was blowing out…it was better than the line shows…this is an organization loving what they’re seeing from one of their emerging talents. I can’t wait to see him.

Scouting reports call Jenkins a power sinker guy now. His number one pitch sits in the low-90s and can reach 95-96 when he reaches for it. Look for that sinker to move the most when it’s dialed back to 92-93, and ride a steadier four seam plain when he guns it.

Jenkins also throws a plus slider, and with downward movement on both is a groundball artist. I know you’ve never heard this before, so be prepared for a shocker – he’s also working on his changeup.

In his draft year, Jenkins was called a potential “workhorse.” If the reports continue to evolve from “pudgy” to “impressive” regarding his physique, he could be a welcome addition to the back of the Blue Jay rotation by year end.

The MINOR LEAGUE REPORT will update the blog on the stats of two AA starters Drew Hutchison and Deck McGuire in the next few days and will also look at the “next wave” in Noah Syndergaard and Justin Niccolino.